Maliszewska J, Tęgowska E. Int J Pest Manage. 2017;63(4):331-340.

The effectiveness of insecticides differs with changes in temperature, but insecticide toxicities are determined at constant temperatures. Constant thermal conditions do not occur in the field, where insects can change their behaviors to achieve a preferred temperature. The aim of this study was to assess whether the choice of ambient temperature affects the mortality rate of intoxicated firebugs and Colorado potato beetles. The insects' mortality following insecticide exposure was monitored at constant temperatures (15, 25, and 35°C) as well as in a thermal gradient system, where the insects could freely select their preferred ambient temperature. Firebugs treated with oxadiazine showed 58% higher mortality when held at a constant temperature post-treatment compared to mortality levels seen when able to choose a preferred temperature in a thermal gradient. Similar results were seen in Colorado potato beetles treated with oxadiazine (15%-33% higher mortality in constant vs. preferred temperature) or organophosphate (36% higher mortality in constant vs. preferred temperature). The insects' ability to mitigate the impacts of pesticide exposure by selecting more beneficial thermal conditions is an important consideration for pest management. Therefore, the application rates of insecticides used under field conditions should be additionally analyzed to take this factor into account.



QingYu X, QingWei M, JiFeng S, Pan D, WenChao G, GuoQing L. Pestic Biochem Physiol. 2017;143:173-180. doi: 10.1016/j.pestbp.2017.07.010.

To accomplish consistent, long-term, integrated management (IPM) of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), research assessing the potential of novel, IPM-compatible insecticides is essential. Novaluron is a potent benzoylurea insecticide. In the present paper, we found that novaluron ingestion by the fourth-instar larvae inhibited foliage consumption, reduced larval fresh weight, and delayed development period, in a dose dependent manner. Most of the resulting larvae fail to pupate, and died at prepupae stage, with larvicidal activity comparable with those of cyhalothrin and spinosad but lower than those of fipronil and abamectin. Moreover, many surviving pupae that fed novaluron failed to emerge as adults, in a dose dependent pattern. Furthermore, feeding of novaluron significantly decreased chitin contents in body carcass (without midgut) and integument specimen, whereas the chitin concentration in the midgut peritrophic matrix was not affected. Furthermore, uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine-pyrophosphorylase gene (LdUAP1) and chitin synthase Aa (LdChSAa), which were mainly responsible for chitin biosynthesis in ectodermally-derived tissues, were suppressed and activated respectively after novaluron ingestion. Therefore, novaluron is an effective benzoylurea insecticide to L. decemlineata fourth-instar larvae. It inhibited chitin biosynthesis in ectodermally-derived tissues, disrupted ecdysis, impaired pupation and adult emergence, and led to death in juvenile life stages.

Crossley MS, Chen YH, Groves RL, Schoville SD. Mol Ecol. 2017;26(22):6284-6300. doi: 10.1111/mec.14339.

The ability of insect pests to rapidly and repeatedly adapt to insecticides has long challenged entomologists and evolutionary biologists. Since Crow's seminal paper on insecticide resistance in 1957, new data and insights continue to emerge that are relevant to the old questions about how insecticide resistance evolves: such as whether it is predominantly mono- or polygenic, and evolving from standing vs. de novo genetic variation. Many studies support the monogenic hypothesis, and current management recommendations assume single- or two-locus models. But inferences could be improved by integrating data from a broader sample of pest populations and genomes. Here, we generate evidence relevant to these questions by applying a landscape genomics framework to the study of insecticide resistance in a major agricultural pest, Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). Genome-environment association tests using genomic variation from 16 populations spanning gradients of landscape variables associated with insecticide exposure over time revealed 42 strong candidate insecticide resistance genes, with potentially overlapping roles in multiple resistance mechanisms. Measurements of resistance to a widely used insecticide, imidacloprid, among 47 L. decemlineata populations revealed heterogeneity at a small (2 km) scale and no spatial signature of origin or spread throughout the landscape. Analysis of nucleotide diversity suggested candidate resistance loci have undergone varying degrees of selective sweeps, often maintaining similar levels of nucleotide diversity to neutral loci. This study suggests that many genes are involved in insecticide resistance in L. decemlineata and that resistance likely evolves from both de novo and standing genetic variation.

Yamano Y, Sasaki H, Wada A. Chem Pharm Bull. 2017;65(10):940-944. doi: 10.1248/cpb.c17-00462.

A mild deacylation method for 3,5-dinitrobenzoates using methanolic solutions of amines, such as dialkylamines, was developed. The method's versatility was confirmed by applying it to synthesizing a key intermediate for Colorado potato beetle pheromone.



López-Galiano MJ, Ruiz-Arroyo V, Fernández-Crespo E, et al. J Plant Physiol. 2017;215:59-64. doi: 10.1016/j.jplph.2017.04.013.

Insect-plant interactions are governed by a complex equilibrium between the mechanisms through which plant recognize insect attack and orchestrate downstream signaling events that trigger plant defense responses, and the mechanisms by which insects overcome plant defenses. Due to this tight and dynamic interplay, insight into the nature of the plant defense response can be gained by analyzing changes in the insect herbivores digestive system upon plant feeding. In this work we have identified a Solanum melongena miraculin-like protease inhibitor in the midgut juice of Colorado potato larvae feeding on eggplant plants treated with the natural inducer of plant defenses hexanoic acid. We analyzed the corresponding gene expression by qRT-PCR and our results showed that this eggplant miraculin-like gene enhanced induction contributes to the hexanoic acid priming effect in this Solanaceae species. Moreover, our data evidencing that OPDA might be involved in this gene regulation highlights its potential as biomarker in eggplant plant responses to stress mediated this oxylipin signaling pathway.

Wetzel WC, Thaler JS. Oecologia. 2018;186(2):483-493. doi: 10.1007/s00442-017-4034-x.

A consequence of plant diversity is that it can allow or force herbivores to consume multiple plant species, which studies indicate can have major effects on herbivore fitness. An underappreciated but potentially important factor modulating the consequences of multi-species diets is the extent to which herbivores can choose their diets versus being forced to consume specific host-plant sequences. We examined how host-selection behavior alters the effects of multi-species diets using the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) and diets of potato plants (Solanum tuberosum), tomato plants (S. lycopersicum), or both. When we gave beetles simultaneous access to both plants, allowing them to choose their diets, their final mass was within 0.1% of the average mass across both monocultures and 43.6% lower than mass on potato, the superior host in monoculture. This result indicates these beetles do not benefit from a mixed diet, and that the presence of tomato, an inferior but suitable host, makes it difficult to use potato. In contrast, when we forced beetles to switch between host species, their final mass was 37.8% less than the average of beetles fed constant diets of either host species and within 3.5% of the mass on tomato even though they also fed on potato. This indicates preventing host-selection behavior magnified the negative effects of this multi-species diet. Our results imply that ecological contexts that constrain host-selection or force host-switches, such as communities with competition or predation, will lead plant species diversity to reduce the performance of insect herbivores.


Booth E, Alyokhin A, Pinatti S.  Insect Science. 2017;24(2):295-302. doi: 10.1111/1744-7917.12286.

Cannibalism, or intraspecific predation, can play a major role in changing individual fitness and population processes. In insects, cannibalism frequently occurs across life stages, with cannibals consuming a smaller or more vulnerable stage. Predation of adult insects on one another is considered to be uncommon. We investigated adult cannibalism in the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), which is an oligophagous herbivore specializing on plants in family Solanaceae, and an important agricultural pest. Under laboratory conditions, starvation and crowding encouraged teneral adults to feed upon each other, which reduced their weight loss during the period of starvation. However, pupae were attacked and consumed before adults. Injured beetles had a higher probability of being cannibalized than intact beetles. Males were more frequently attacked than females, but that appeared to be a function of their smaller size rather than other gender-specific traits. Cannibalizing eggs at a larval stage did not affect beetle propensity to cannibalize adults at an adult stage. When given a choice between conspecific adults and mealworms, the beetles preferred to eat conspecifics. Cannibalistic behavior, including adult cannibalism, could be important for population persistence in this species.

Tryjanowski P, Sparks TH, Blecharczyk A, Małecka-Jankowiak I, Switek S, Sawinska Z. American Journal of Potato Research. 2018;95(1):26-32. doi: 10.1007/s12230-017-9611-3.

Potato Solanum tuberosum is one of the world's four most important crops. Its cultivation is steadily increasing in response to the need to feed a growing world population. The yield of potato is influenced inter alia by both climate and pests. The main defoliator pest of potato is Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Using data from a long-term experiment (1958-2013) in western Poland, we show that increasing temperature has affected the trophic relationship between potato and Colorado potato beetle. The planting, leafing, flowering and harvest dates for potato were advanced, after controlling for different cultivars, by 2.00 days, 3.04 days, 3.80 days and 3.42 days respectively for every 1°C increase in temperature. In contrast, first treatment against Colorado potato beetle advanced by 4.66 days for every 1°C increase in temperature, and, furthermore, the number of treatments against the beetle increased by 0.204 per 1°C increase in temperature. This suggests that the beetle responds faster to increasing temperature than the plant does, but both parts of the system are probably greatly modified by farming practices.

JuneSun Y, Mogilicherla K, Gurusamy D, Xien C, Chereddy, S. C. R. R., Palli SR.  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018;115(33):8334-8339. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1809381115.

RNA interference (RNAi) is being used to develop methods to control pests and disease vectors. RNAi is robust and systemic in coleopteran insects but is quite variable in other insects. The determinants of efficient RNAi in coleopterans, as well as its potential mechanisms of resistance, are not known. RNAi screen identified a double-stranded RNA binding protein (StaufenC) as a major player in RNAi. StaufenC homologs have been identified in only coleopteran insects. Experiments in two coleopteran insects, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and Tribolium castaneum, showed the requirement of StaufenC for RNAi, especially for processing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to small interfering RNA. RNAi-resistant cells were selected by exposing L. decemlineata, Lepd-SL1 cells to the inhibitor of apoptosis 1 dsRNA for multiple generations. The resistant cells showed lower levels of StaufenC expression compared with its expression in susceptible cells. These studies showed that coleopteran-specific StaufenC is required for RNAi and is a potential target for RNAi resistance. The data included in this article will help improve RNAi in noncoleopteran insects and manage RNAi resistance in coleopteran insects.

Bozov PI, Georgieva YP. Natural Product Communications. 2017;12(3):327-328.

Fourteen neo-clerodane diterpenoids isolated from Scutellaria altissima (Lamiaceae) were tested for insect antifeedant activity against Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say. Potato leaf disks treated with small amounts of the compounds (concentration 1000, 100, 10 ppm) resulted in good to very good antifeedant activity. Clerodin (1), scutecyprin (11) and 11-epi-scutecolumnin C (12) showed strong feeding inhibition at 1000 ppm and exhibited significant antifeedant activity at a concentration of 100 ppm. Activity was established by calculating the feeding ratio (FR) between the consumed areas of treated disks (CTD) and control disks (CCD). For comparison, FR50 values were determined as the FR at a CCD of 50%. Structural features of the compounds associated with the changes in activity and structure-antifeedant activity relationships are discussed. For the first time the anti-feedant activity has been evaluated of neo-clerodane diterpenoids with an unusual R-configuration of the carbon atom C-11.