Bacterial and fungal infections induce bursts of dopamine in the haemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata and greater wax moth Galleria mellonella.

Chertkova EA, Grizanova EV, Dubovskiy IM. J Invertebr Pathol. 2018;153:203-206. doi: 10.1016/j.jip.2018.02.020.

Dopamine (DA) is known as a hormone neurotransmitter molecule involved in several stress reactions in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Following infections with the fungi Metarhizium robertsii or Beauveria bassiana and the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis, dopamine the concentration was measured at different time points in the haemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata and the larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella. The infection with M. robertsii increased (4 to 12-fold) DA concentrations in the haemolymph of the potato beetle larvae and the oral infection by B. thuringiensis also lead to a 30 and 45-fold increase. During infection of the greater wax moth larvae with Beauveria bassiana and B. thuringiensis DA increased 4 to 20-fold and about 2 to 2,5-fold respectively, compared to non-infected insects. The relative DA concentrations varied between the two insects and depended on the pathogens and post infection time.